Tips

How to help your child have a good morning This is the Backpack Newsletter

Be generous with praise
Observe your child carefully and comment on the things that are done well. When you see an area that needs improvement, find a positive way to talk about it with your child.
 
Encourage "personal best"
Help your child by encouraging him or her to do the best in school and at home. Remember, "personal best" does not mean "perfect", and learning is not the same as high grades. Children, like adults, need the freedom to make mistakes and to learn from them.
 
Make learning a priority
Your attitude toward school attendance, education and involvement in the school makes a strong and lasting impression on your child. Show your child, by example, that learning is a priority.
 
Show interest in school work
  • Talk about school each day.
  • Ask to see classwork.
  • Have your child read aloud to you.
  • Read to and with your child from a variety of material in your first language.
  • Encourage your child to discuss new ideas and opinions.
  • Show appreciation for good efforts.

Offer suggestions for success

Help your child use the following strategies to improve performance in school:
  • Read the assignment when it is given.
  • Keep a list of new vocabulary.
  • Proofread assignments to catch errors before writing a final draft.
  • Review notes before a test.
Schedule study time
Set up an area for homework away from noise and distractions. Post a family calendar that schedules school project deadlines, after-school activities, mid-term dates, exam periods and report card dates.

Education starts at school and continues at home. There are plenty of things that you, as parents, can do at home to help your child along a strong developmental path. Here are some helpful tips to give your child an advantage at home, which will transfer to the classroom.

Read, Read, Read

Reading is an important cognitive function for children to learn. Take every opportunity you can to read with your child. Make the kitchen, living room, and their bedrooms, into “reading zones” and devote some time every day to reading short stories, homework, or anything that is particularly challenging for them.

Make it Fun!

Games can be exceptional learning tools. Board games, card games, memory games and word games subtly engage a child in learning essential problem solving skills, while ensuring they have fun! Showing them how much fun learning can be will make them more eager to learn.

Embrace Technology

Computers, tablets, and mobile devices have access to all sorts of educational resources that can help your child learn in a collection of different ways. From games to writing to reading, technology offers a number of different ways to engage kids as they learn. Don’t be scared to let them get used to technology, the sooner they learn about the devices, the more comfortable they will be when using them in the future.

Encouragement is Golden

Remember to encourage your children through the learning process. Positive reinforcement goes a long way in helping a developing mind absorb information. Mistakes should not be cause for concern. Instead, view them as learning opportunities and help your child realize where, and how, they can improve.

Count, Write, Read

Practice, repetition, and routine help a young mind develop skills faster, and become more comfortable with the skills they already have. Set time aside to count with your children, let them write stories for you, and read them together. This little bit of effort can make a world of difference in the long run.

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